Go Back   Sheltie Forums > Health > Behavior
Become a Premium Member Rules Support Sheltie Nation Member Map

Notices

Reply
View First Unread View First Unread  
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 10:37 AM
take4roll10's Avatar
take4roll10 take4roll10 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 6,917
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corbinam View Post
I think it matters. If you own a dog from a line of dogs with fears, the nature of the fears may affect how you address it. Also, should you get your next dog from that breeder?

As an informed sheltie owner, I think it's important for me to know the strengths and weaknesses of my dogs and their pedigrees.
Absolutely agree! I'd also like to add that knowing it could be hereditary could reduce your frustrations with your dog. You can train and train and train your heart out, but if your dog is genetically fearful, shy or aggressive, training can only take you so far.

My dog has been through numerous classes, constant training, been to a behavioral veterinarian, been on both natural and prescription medicine and none have made a significant difference. Does that mean I'll stop training her and trying to condition and counter-condition behaviors? Absolutely not! I will work with her until the day she dies, but at least I know that this is who she, it's most likely in her genetics, and she will probably never fully get over her shyness and reactive behavior.
__________________
Bailey CGC RN OA AXJ
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #12  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 04:02 PM
sarasomething sarasomething is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: fl
Posts: 137
Default

just an observation: i recently had a chance to see some of the (now grown up) siblings of my own sheltie. same litter, bred and raised and owned by the same person. so the genetics and environment were the same. the dogs are *very* different. one (my dog's sister) was very friendly and playful, ran right up to me and wanted to play with my dog. the other one (the brother) was super shy and nervous.

anyway i guess the individual personalities and issues still vary a lot, even within the same genetic line. i wouldn't necessarily write off a breeder because they produced a dog with behavior issues. (i guess if they were knowingly breeding dogs with behavior issues that'd be different...)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 04:50 PM
corbinam's Avatar
corbinam corbinam is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8,307
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sarasomething View Post
anyway i guess the individual personalities and issues still vary a lot, even within the same genetic line. i wouldn't necessarily write off a breeder because they produced a dog with behavior issues. (i guess if they were knowingly breeding dogs with behavior issues that'd be different...)
Definitely true--there are always outliers one way or the other. Before making a blanket generalization, you'd want a lot of examples. One shy dog doesn't mean the line is shy, nor does two...you need a pattern.
__________________
ADCH Coastal's Blue Train Special "Bentley" CGC SCH-Silver JCH-Bronze TM-Bronze
Whisperwind's Pursuit of Perfection "Lexi" CGC SCH MAD SAM RM JM
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 07:35 PM
Caro's Avatar
Caro Caro is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Canberra, Australia
Posts: 4,444
Default

It's interesting too in light of what we say about the 'personalities' of certain breeds. We expect some breeds to be out-going and some to be reserved, so we assume these as genetic traits. I suppose it's like the difference between pig-headed and determined, it's how the trait is manifest and used. Maybe rather than focusing solely on getting a shy dog to be confident we should focus on channelling the personality trait into something constructive.

I can think of my Tully - who was (and probably still is) a shy dog. But get her running, or put her around animals and she is a different dog, her adrenalin pumps and she's in her element. At other times she is a gentle and sensitive soul and I wouldn't want that to change. I don't expect her to love other dogs (it would just be nice if she didn't bark at them) but she is very gentle around people and would make a good therapy dog, something I wouldn't expect a bold, in your face type of dog.
__________________
Caro and the pups - Deska and Tully
& Tully's cats - Kalypso and Katkat.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 08:19 PM
SheltieChe SheltieChe is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,287
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by take4roll10 View Post
Absolutely agree! I'd also like to add that knowing it could be hereditary could reduce your frustrations with your dog. You can train and train and train your heart out, but if your dog is genetically fearful, shy or aggressive, training can only take you so far.

My dog has been through numerous classes, constant training, been to a behavioral veterinarian, been on both natural and prescription medicine and none have made a significant difference. Does that mean I'll stop training her and trying to condition and counter-condition behaviors? Absolutely not! I will work with her until the day she dies, but at least I know that this is who she, it's most likely in her genetics, and she will probably never fully get over her shyness and reactive behavior.
you can only get frustrated if you give yourself permission to do so
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 08:23 PM
SheltieChe SheltieChe is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,287
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corbinam View Post
I think it matters. If you own a dog from a line of dogs with fears, the nature of the fears may affect how you address it. Also, should you get your next dog from that breeder?

As an informed sheltie owner, I think it's important for me to know the strengths and weaknesses of my dogs and their pedigrees.
it is important if you are looking at breeders and lines, specifically if you compete you want qualities of the parents you love and respect. But in the end you get dog you were suppose to get some dogs are in our life because they make us better people...
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old Feb 26, 2014, 08:50 PM
SheltieChe SheltieChe is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,287
Default

as inspiration piece am posting this clip from great trainers with great dog who won multiple competitions, who started out like this with extreme fears
http://www.oneminddogs.com/article/a...-seesaw-video/
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.