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Considering a Sheltie

Discussion in 'Considering a Sheltie?' started by Gabe, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. Gabe

    Gabe Forums Novice

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    Hey everyone,
    Im a 19 year old college student looking into getting a sheltie. The last couple months ive been reading anything and everything about shelties i could find online and im really enamored with the breed. I love the idea of a versatile dog that i can go on outdoor adventures with but that is also down to curl up beside me on the couch when i feel like staying in (I realize they are a high energy dog and i am pretty active myself so exercise shouldnt be a problem). Recently my dad passed away due to cancer and while it may seem like it's an impulse buy, I've given it a lot of thought and I'm sure I'm ready for the commitment. My dad and I were always really close and with his passing, I'm in the market for a new best friend. I've got a house with a yard lined up that I'll be moving into with my sister (also a college student) in the summer. She has a really sweet Airedale terrier/golden retriever mix. Anyways before I go all in and add a puppy to my family I had a couple questions I thought I'd take up with the experts:
    1. What gender would you recommend I get? I've seen mixed reviews everywhere I've looked on the subject.
    2. Do you think a sheltie would be right for the lifestyle of a college student?(my sister and I will be able to help each other out so I doubt either of our dogs would have to be alone for too long).
    3. What type of things should i look for when picking out my puppy from a breeder?
    4. And finally, in general what are your favorite aspects of the sheltie that have endeared you to the breed?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Chris

    Chris Premium Member

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    Now that you've done your homework, you're ready to do two things:
    1. Read the best book there is on raising a healthy, well-adjusted dog: The Art of Raising a Puppy by The Monks of New Skete. We swear by it here at Nattering Springs.
    2. Go to the American Shetland Sheepdog Association website. There you will find reputable breeders.

    I think a Sheltie would thrive on a college lifestyle if you have -- and take -- the time to do the puppy training properly. I have one male and three females. Beckon is our "big guy." Honestly, he reminds me of a college guy. Layla, his sister, is gentle and kind. I recommend telling the breeder exactly the kind of lifestyle you live and what you hope to do with your Sheltie. I did that, and my breeder picked out the perfect, and I mean perfect, puppy.

    My favorite things about Shelties? First, they're highly intelligent. They're sensitive and intuitive; you never yell at a Sheltie. They're intensely loyal to their person. Finally, they are incredibly beautiful.

    Good luck -- we'll be here for you every step of the adventure, Gabe!
     
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  3. corbinam

    corbinam Moderator

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    How exciting! Welcome to the forum! I'm sorry for the loss of your father. Mine passed away of cancer this year as well, I know how difficult it can be. I've certainly looked to my dogs for comfort.

    1. What gender would you recommend I get? I've seen mixed reviews everywhere I've looked on the subject.
    Some breeds have a gender gap in terms of personality. I've found that it varies greatly with shelties, and I haven't really seen a pattern. Some people think that males are clingier, and females are more independent--but my dogs are the opposite. I think the most important is picking the puppy whose personality is a fit and not worry about gender.
    2. Do you think a sheltie would be right for the lifestyle of a college student?(my sister and I will be able to help each other out so I doubt either of our dogs would have to be alone for too long).
    Yes, as long as you aren't the type to stay out all night on a regular basis. Shelties are a breed that is very sensitive and bonds closely to their owner. It's important to spend a lot of time playing with, loving on, and training your pup. You already mentioned exercise--and yes that's an important component as well.
    3. What type of things should i look for when picking out my puppy from a breeder?
    A good breeder can help point you in the right direction. Be honest with what you want. Do you want a calmer dog? A busier dog? A friendly dog? A sweet dog? Remember that if you go to visit and one puppy is sleepy, it doesn't mean that puppy is independent or shy. Just tired! That's where the breeder is a great resource. Depending on what kind of puppy you want is what you want to look for. Obviously you probably don't want the puppy that's cowering in the corner, but if you're with a good breeder those puppies are pretty few and far between.
    4. And finally, in general what are your favorite aspects of the sheltie that have endeared you to the breed?
    Oh man. How much time do we have? Ha! I think my favorite thing is that my dogs are up for anything. We can go for a hike, a walk along the beach, do agility, cuddle on the couch, play fetch in the yard, go for a long walk, just hang out outside and soak up the sun, cuddle together at bedtime--and they are up for it. They want to make their owners happy, which is an awesome trait.
     
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  4. Cindy

    Cindy Forums Enthusiast

    Best thing about Shelties? They want to please their person :)
    My boy went through 2 surgeries and radiation on his leg without ANY complaining. Amazing dog, and all because he trusted me.
     
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  5. Cleo2014

    Cleo2014 Premium Member

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    I agree the best trait is how loyal they are and how they always want to please their person. Mine follow me everywhere and while some people would not like that, I LOVE it. I don't really like to be alone so that is fine for me. :)
     
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  6. Cara Sandler

    Cara Sandler Forums Enthusiast

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    As far as gender - I have 2 girls. My older girl, Spirit, is independent, a little reserved in new situations, but likes and gets along with everyone. She goes with the flow and was incredibly easy to train. She'll want to cuddle first thing in the morning and sometimes in the evening, but for the most part she has no time for that. She does miss me when I travel for work but is honestly just as happy staying with her agility trainers when I'm gone. She usually doesn't bother saying good-bye to me when I leave her there.

    Then there's my puppy, Skylar. She is sweet and affectionate, loves to cuddle, actively seeks me out for hugs and play. While she is fine staying with our agility trainers, she definitely misses me more than Spirit does and doesn't want me to leave. She is bold and opinionated and will certainly let you know if you do something she doesn't like. She's a pistol.

    So I'm not sure that gender is so much an issue when considering temperament.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
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  7. Daisy1015

    Daisy1015 Forums Enthusiast

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    As for is. Sheltie a good dog for a college student....this depends on the type of college student you are! I was hyper responsible, all about working and school and not partying. My dog would have been my priority when not in class / work, ahead of social life and my studying was largely at home. My hours away would have been similar to that of my current work schedule full time but regular so dog adjusts. One concern with a dog and being a college student is if you will always be able to be in a dog friendly situation like you are moving into. I had to move alot and had roommate changes that delayed getting a dog until after college. However i would have still been a very responsible dog owner younger.
    Dogs are also expensive if in need of medical treatment or boarding. Income is limited in college so another consideration.
    And shelties typically bark , possibly a lot , and high pitched so it travels. They can be trained to improve in this but they think they are communicating. It is part of how the breed alerted shepherds and scared off birds. This can br difficult in an apartment. If you have alot of visitors shelties are sensitive to noise and reserved with strangers and need to be trusted not to accidently leave doors open. Shelties are not an off leash dog breed... they will go into flight mode if spooked and will potentially take off to herd cars, birds, etc. so really the question is if your life style is that of a young adult or stereotype of a college student. To the latter I would advise waiting.

    As for gender it does not matter. More males will be available as pets though. Pick to match your personality and be honest with breeder about your needs they will help match you.

    I love then intelligence and being in tune to their owner and all the grooming. Do you have lots of grooming time? They are higher energy especially when young but not overly hyper usually and have a twinkle. They are gentle and do well with kids and need to be with their people. Negatives the barking and some can be a little high strung usually in certain areas not overall especially as a teen. Lots of patient training in areas like barking triggers and when to herd.
     
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  8. Hanne

    Hanne Forums Enthusiast

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