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How to train GSD not to eat our own chickens and lambs?!?

Discussion in 'General Dog Chat' started by bwibwigouza, Apr 8, 2017.

  1. Hanne

    Hanne Forums Enthusiast

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    So agree.

    Jessica:

    Carmie is so young that she could have a good life under different circumstances
    - I also feel sorry for the family that will make it as good for her
    - but sometimes we must realize that things have gone awry.
    Both deserve to start anew.
     
  2. JessicaR

    JessicaR Forums Enthusiast

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    Cara, I agree, this dog should not be working livestock, but the OP never said she was using the dog for herding activities.

    I have ducks, chickens, turkeys, and rabbits, I expect my dogs to not touch them at all. The shelties I have had no problems with this. A couple of verbal corrections to leave it was sufficient for them. The guide dog fosters on the other hand can sometimes being a little more stubborn about it. While I never leave the dogs unsupervised with the livestock, accidents do happen the chickens and turkeys in particular a good at flying over the fence, or they stick their heads out of it. A good hard leash correction cured most of the guide dog pups not to go after them! We did have a boxer that was just to high in prey drive to get him to stop. He was washed from the program by the trainers.

    Hanne, just because they are having troubles right now doesn't mean they need to rehome, or that the dog would be happier. GSD's tend to have a harder time readjusting to new homes. Training is the best thing they can do for that dog, especially obedience.
     
  3. Hanne

    Hanne Forums Enthusiast

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    Jessica - Luckily we do not need to have the same meaning :smile2: but you must not compare the mind/intelligence of a boxer and GSD
    Obedience intelligence: German Shepherds no. 3 - Sheltie no. 6 -Boxer no. 48

    "GSD's tend to have a harder time readjusting to new homes"
    - this is certainly not my experience after more than 30 years life together with my German Shepherds.
    - and for more than 20 years I have lived in these circles
    - I have met several "misunderstood" GSD which has gotten an amazing life after a reassignment (rehome)
    - and made a new family happy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  4. JessicaR

    JessicaR Forums Enthusiast

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    I was not comparing the boxer to the GSD just pointing out that the only puppy we raised that physical correction didn't stop the behavior of trying to kill prey was a boxer.

    As for the harder time readjusting to new homes... I will stick with that. Not every gsd does, but their is a certainly enough that it is even pointed out by the guide dog trainers, that is actually one of the top reasons why they have washed out of the guide dog program. Since you have GSD experience you should know then they bond closely with their family, unlike a golden or a lab that are usually happy with anyone giving them food! Lol! Also note I said harder time not impossible time.

    As for experience I have had german shepherds most of my life, either with the dogs I grew up with or the guide dog puppies I have raised, and my soon to pup I am getting Saturday.

    I still stick with the fact the OP needs to find an experienced GSD trainer, and work on this dogs obedience training. If that fails to work then yes it may be best for the safety of the dog and the livestock to rehome, but that would be a last resort scenario.
     
  5. Hanne

    Hanne Forums Enthusiast

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    Advertisement from today under reassignment in the Danish German Shepherd Dog Club
    Danish Association of the Blind Guide dogs scheme
    seeking German shepherd dog to education as guide dogs
     
  6. Caro

    Caro Moderator

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    Getting back on topic.

    I don't have experience with GSDs specifically (except when they're in my classes), but I do have some general thoughts that would apply to any breed.

    I think there may be a greater link with letting your GSD hunt and kill mice and birds, rather than what she's eating. She's found a job, and she's not differentiating between hunting small things and larger things, or the type of prey. Until (and unless) she learns the difference I would discourage all hunting behaviour.

    Given she's already killed a lamb, you probably need professional help. There are people around who specialise in training farm dogs. I know a lot of people with working dogs (kelpies and cattle dogs) who never leave the dogs unsupervised around the livestock. Once they've done their work they are tied up or kept in a run so they don't bother the livestock. You are definitely going to have to keep her fenced in.

    Another thought - she's only young, how much exercise is she getting? It sounds like she needs to burn off energy and not invent her own fun. Does she play fetch, because chasing a ball would be a better option than chasing living things.
     
    Hanne likes this.

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