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Autoimmune Thyroiditis?

Discussion in 'Diseases & Illnesses' started by IslandSheltie, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. IslandSheltie

    IslandSheltie Forums Novice

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    Feb 6, 2015
    Bahamas
    Hi Everyone,
    My name is Amanda and Jax is my 3 year old intact male sheltie. I've been reading the forums for awhile but this is my first post.
    I had Jax's thyroid levels tested last week, just as a routine check, he has no symptoms at all.
    Everything was normal except for his Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies.
    Here are his results:

    Total T4 - 2.6 Adult Range 0.8-3.5
    Free T4(ED) - 28 Adult Range 8-40
    TSH - 0.09 Adult Range 0-0.60
    Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies - 137% Adult Range:<10% = Negative
    10%-25% Equivocal
    >25% Positive


    I sent his test info off to Dr. Jean Dodds for a consultation and she suggests medicating him immediately.
    I also have others telling me he doesn't need to be medicated yet, just monitored as his other levels are normal and he has no clinical symptoms.
    I just want to do the right thing for him, and I'm really confused about what that is. I don't want to unnecessarily medicate him, but I also don't want to wait until he's really sick before I do anything.
    He will not be bred, that was never even on the table, but he is intact because I feel that he's healthier that way.
    Do any of you have any advice or experience with this issue?

    Thanks for any advice you can offer!!
    Amanda & Jax
     
  2. Ann

    Ann Moderator

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    Feb 25, 2008
    Western Connecticut
    Hi Amanda and welcome to the Forum! I don't have any personal experience with Jax' results, but I do trust Dr. Jean Dodds. We have a number of members whose pups have had thyroid issues...if you haven't it might be worth doing a search here for thyroid posts. It's also important to know that "normal" Sheltie thyroid levels differ from other breeds. You'd be surprised at how many vets aren't aware of this.

    Here is one of the best sites I know for information on Sheltie thyroid problems. Hope it helps you!
    http://www.illinoissheltierescue.com/thyroid.html
     
    Hanne likes this.
  3. ghggp

    ghggp Moderator

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    Aug 28, 2011
    Grosse Pointe, Michigan
    Thanks for the link Ann!

    I was shock to read:
    Once you start your Sheltie on Thyroid Medication, it is very important that it be given correctly. Thyroid Medication must be given on an empty stomach, either 1 hour before OR 3 hours after eating.
    We have found that giving the medication with food, can lower its effectiveness significantly.

    I have had four Shelties on thyroid meds over the years and NEVER EVER did the vets give this information!
     
    Ann likes this.
  4. Ann

    Ann Moderator

    5,288
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    Feb 25, 2008
    Western Connecticut
    I don't remember where or how I found this link but I've had it for years and shared it with my vets. It's a great source for thyroid in Shelties, and they reference Dr. Jean Dodds who is an expert in the area. That's why I'd trust what she says. My Sprite is about to be tested...her coat texture has changed significiantly in the last six months and I cannot get weight off her even though she's on low-fat food and plays constantly with Flurry. Thyroid is the first thing we thought of.....
     
  5. IslandSheltie

    IslandSheltie Forums Novice

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    Feb 6, 2015
    Bahamas
    Thank you so much for your replies. I’ve tried the search feature but I’m not finding anything exactly like Jax. Most have symptoms of some kind. I will keep looking.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2018
    Ann likes this.
  6. corbinam

    corbinam Moderator

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    Oct 14, 2008
    Ohio
    I would tend to side with Dr. Jean Dodds. She's an expert in thyroid issues and is very familiar with thyroid issues in shelties. Not to discredit vets--but they know about thyroid issues more generally, and with breeds in general (for the most part).
     

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