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Home alone - help!

Discussion in 'Puppies 101' started by Rachell2492, Feb 3, 2020.

  1. Rachell2492

    Rachell2492 Forums Regular

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    Okay, so Izzy is now 14 weeks old (hooray)! We have had her since she was 8 weeks old.

    Up until last week, I had been on holidays. Towards the end of the holidays I worked really hard to spend time away from Izzy during the day, so that she would not be scared when I went back to work and she was home alone.
    While we’re out, we use a puppy cam and I go home at lunch to feed her and spend a small amount of time with her.
    My issue is, that over the weekend we spent more time with her, as my fiancé and I were home. Now today, she has gone nuts! She barks as soon as I’m out of sight and is nipping at me like crazy. She did this to a lesser amount last week too, but settled when we spoke to her or played with her. When we get home, we have playtime and a short rest before dinner, normally a sleep and a walk around the backyard (until she’s had her final vaccinations) and then bed.
    She has always gotten super excited when we get home and I’m trying to train her to settle before we let her out of her pen, as challenging as that is! But, I don’t want her to develop separation anxiety!
    She hasn’t had her final round of shots, and is still staying in a largish play pen inside when we’re out as she isn’t completely toilet trained (but going really well).
    We have two weeks before her final vaccinations and we have to do some more work before leaving her safely outside during the day. Other than getting someone in to see her through the day or taking her to daycare, does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage what I’m assuming is an overly excited puppy? Is playtime the key?
    Maybe I’m doing something wrong.
    Thank you all in advance for your support and advice.
     
  2. Hanne

    Hanne Premium Member

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    Here we have always taken our puppies on small trips once we get them home.
    It is so important that they become socialized
    so that they can become small confident individuals.

    Until others come up with all their good advice,

    You get mine personal way:
    My puppies are with me all the time when I am at home,
    that way they learn the house rules and are not cut off from me.

    If you walk away from your dog right away when you get it home,
    you risk that it gets separation anxiety..

    She has just been separated from her mom, siblings and her safe home.
    For many puppies, it is a traumatic experience.

    In the wild, The puppy would be too small to handle on its own,
    and the mom would not leave her puppies unless
    there were others to look after them.

    Of course, I greet my dog when I get home.
    The greeting ritual is important for the dog (look at wolf behavior)

    So it does not get too boring :lol:
    you get my favorite link -for us new Sheltie owners
    so we may better understand this little sensitive breed.
    http://sheltieforums.com/threads/are-shelties-for-everyone.22964/
     
  3. ghggp

    ghggp Moderator

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    Good thing you try to not get excited about leaving or coming home... Just make it as calm as possible!

    I also just posted about trying
    Calming Diffuser for Dogs, Diffuser
    https://www.chewy.com/sentry-calmin...&utm_source=google-product&utm_content=Sentry

    Keep doing positive reinforcement training... keep the mind occupied by positive teaching moments. Keep a KONG handy with kibble you moisten with water and stuff the kong and place it in the freezer. Give it to her before you leave.

    Do not make the routine of leaving the same. I saw a great video that a dog was picking up on her owner's routine and became anxious as soon as the ritual of grabbing the coat, purse and keys happened. The dog would nip at the owner's legs. The trainer said to break up the routine. Get the coat, sit on the sofa, get up, grab the purse, go in the kitchen and get a glass of water. Finally, grab the keys, sit in another room for 5 minutes. Finally, get up and calmly walk out. By varying the routine the dog finally calmed down when the owner left! Quite remarkable actually...
     
    Sandy in CT, Sharon7 and Ann like this.
  4. Sharon7

    Sharon7 Premium Member

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    Makes a lot of sense, Gloria - my first Sheltie always got excited when I grabbed my sunglasses; she knew outdoor time was coming, either a walk or yard time. It was pretty funny. They quickly learn the cues from our routines.
     
    Rachell2492 and Hanne like this.
  5. Hanne

    Hanne Premium Member

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    Yes, we have all different views on routines :wink2:

    From they are very small puppies
    I've made my "I go from you" routines exactly the same
    for all my dogs and everyone has been calm.

    Coat on, find the bag, keys, shoes on - and so on
    - take part of their dry food that is thrown around the floor
    with the words "goodbye, mom is coming back" :lol:

    In time, they are actually waiting for me to get ready to go
    so they can get their reward :yes:

    I do not know :confused2:
    but none of them has suffered from separation anxiety
    - maybe because they know what is going to happen
    and associate goodbye with reward :smile2:
     
  6. Piper's mom

    Piper's mom Premium Member

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    When Piper was young I had someone come by to let him go outside to pee when I was at work and as he got older (6 months or so) and could hold it longer I'd swing by, take him for a short walk or let him run in the yard and then it'd be back into his penned in area in my bedroom (I also had a baby gate). When I'd come home I would have him sit and wait for me to let him out while I would chat with my mom and pay attention to my other dog. I also started him at a puppy class a week after his last set of shots and then beginner obedience and then more and more obedience (my mom said when Piper was 2..."Piper's been going for obedience for a long time...when is he going to graduate?"
    I said never lol. He's almost 5 now and we do competitive obedience but he is truly the most balanced dog (except for his jealousy of my now 2 year old dog). He can't wait for me to leave so he can have a nap!
    So really the best thing you can do is get your pup registered in a puppy class and then as they grow into a beginner class. It's really the best way to socialize your pup in all aspects of things from behaving at home, on walks and just in public. It all starts there.
     
  7. Rachell2492

    Rachell2492 Forums Regular

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    Thank you for your supportive advice. We have just started puppy school and she seems to be a bit calmer, the more she is getting used to the routine.
     
  8. Rachell2492

    Rachell2492 Forums Regular

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    It’s funny how Izzy is starting to pick up that I’m going when she hears my car keys. Sometimes she’s okay with it and others she’s not. Hopefully she’ll learn in good time that I’ll always be back!
     
    Hanne likes this.
  9. Rachell2492

    Rachell2492 Forums Regular

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    Jan 8, 2020
    Thank you for your response. I’ll keep working at it and see if she gets any calmer. I am hoping she will in time, but I always want to make sure she is happy.
     
  10. Rachell2492

    Rachell2492 Forums Regular

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    Thank you for your response. I have been working to let her be with me as soon as I get home. She follows me everywhere and seems to be settling quicker when she is- for the most part. I hope that I’ll be able to pick up on her cues a little more as she gets older, and that I can make sure I’m responding with the appropriate attention, whether it be play time or just being close.
     
    Hanne likes this.

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