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Retained baby teeth

Discussion in 'Puppies 101' started by Caro, May 26, 2020.

  1. Caro

    Caro Moderator

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    Kismet is 5mths old and has retained her 2 front incisors and 1 canine tooth, The canine is small so may fall out, but the incisors I think might push the front teeth back.

    With Covid we still have not face-to-face consults, you just drop the dog off and stay in the car and they call you when they're finished. I'm not keen about just leaving a 5mth old with strangers and have them operate without my having a full consult first. Plus they keep pushing me to get her desexed (she's a conformation bitch) so I'm a little worried what they'll do. Yea I know I'm being paranoid.

    Anyone have experience with removal of baby teeth? what's the recovery like? Is it painful and stressful?

    should I wait until I can do a face to face consult. I'm not happy with the receptionist just telling me to drop her off to have an operation, I don't want to scare my little girl.
    Kis incisors.jpg
     
  2. Sharon7

    Sharon7 Moderator

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    Caro, bummer on the retained teeth - I've not had to deal with this myself, and Meadow has not lost any teeth yet....:fl I totally understand not wanting to drop her off without actually talking to your vet face to face. Stupid virus. I've hated handing Meadow off to them even just for her shots.
     
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  3. Elei

    Elei Premium Member

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    Poor Kismet!!
    I don't really have experience with this - Kip had one baby tooth that stayed in for quite awhile and I was starting to get really worried. He was scheduled for an appointment, but then it came out on its own. Yay!!

    I also understand not wanting to drop Kismet off at the vet. Kip has gone to the vet twice during the pandemic. One time they let me look in the exam room window while he was getting examined. I was outside. Maybe they can let you do that for Kismet? That made us both feel better, but Kip was still pretty distressed. For his shots, they took him inside and I had to wait outside. He really didn't want to leave me, and was overjoyed to see me when he came out. Stupid virus indeed!!!

    At least my vet totally understands that I want to wait till 18 months for neutering, and doesn't bug me about it.
     
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  4. corbinam

    corbinam Moderator

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    Elise retained her canines. I eventually had them pulled but wished I had done it sooner. It ended up that one of the adult canines came in wrong and eventually needed pulled as well. If I had pulled the baby ones earlier that might not have been the case.
     
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  5. Piper's mom

    Piper's mom Moderator

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    Poor Kismet! While I don't have experience with baby teeth I did have 2 of Piper's incisors pulled (one beside each canine) because of his lance canines. We had it done when he was neutered at 2 and his recovery was incredibly quick. He didn't appear to be in any pain even that evening afterward when he ate his supper and within a week you almost wouldn't have known he had any teeth pulled (his canines were quite close....reminds me I still have those teeth, was thinking of doing something with them (at least getting them cleaned up) and they're still sitting in a bottle lol.
    I can understand your apprehension about them pushing to have her spayed but they'd be looking at a serious lawsuit if they did anything without your written permission.
     
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  6. Piper's mom

    Piper's mom Moderator

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    My sister watched from the window as well when she took her puppy in to the vet...good idea Elei!
     
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  7. Caro

    Caro Moderator

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    Thanks, that's actually a relief to hear he recovered so quickly, hate to have the little one in pain.

    There was a story recently about a poor little dog that had the wrong leg amputated, a friend told me right at the wrong time. Plus I think that receptionist is just rubbing me the wrong way.

    It sounds like it will be a lot better the teeth to come out now before the adult teeth get pushed out. I wonder if there is a way to look into the exam room - thanks I will ask.
     
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  8. ghggp

    ghggp Moderator

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    Treatment for retained diciduous teeth

    There should never be two teeth of the same type in the same place at the same time.

    Therefore, any persistent deciduous teeth should be extracted as early as possible. Do not waituntil 6 months of age to perform the extractions along with neutering. The time of adult tooth eruption is 3-4 months for incisors and 5-6 months for canines. You should examine your pet’s mouth at least once a week to ensure the prompt removal of these teeth.

    Dental radiographs are absolutely critical to the proper performance of deciduous extractions, because there is often some degree of resorption of the deciduous root.

    The extraction of deciduous pet teeth can be very difficult due to the considerable length and thin walls of the deciduous tooth. Resorption of the retained deciduous tooth can also compromise the extraction. Dental x-rays provide this information which allows the practitioner to remove the tooth less invasively. In some cases, the root may be completely resorbed, making the extraction simple. However, if the veterinarian does not perform x-rays to find that the root is already gone, they may attempt to surgically remove it, causing unnecessary pain and trauma to the pet. Some veterinary dentists perform surgical extractions for deciduous canines; however, at Veterinary Specialties and Oral Surgery we generally perform a less invasive closed technique.

    A retained root tip left behind after an extraction attempt may become infected, or more commonly act as a foreign body and create significant inflammation. There are rarely any clinical signs associated with this, but the patient suffers regardless. Dental radiographs should be exposed following all extractions to confirm complete removal of the deciduous tooth.
     
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  9. Sandy in CT

    Sandy in CT Premium Member

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    Isn't she young? Is there a possibility to hang on a bit till she's a tad older? I do realize the younger ones do recover much easier than us older folks. Is htere a second opinion you could get on waiting a bit versus taking them out now? Sucks - sorry - much be a lot of added stress when you are not 100% yourself.
     
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  10. Caro

    Caro Moderator

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    Sandy she's 5mths, just a little baby. Her adult incisors are through, but her canines are still coming up, so those extra baby ones might fall out. The breeder thinks the incisors won't fall out by themselves. None of her siblings or the half siblings born the month before have teeth problems - lucky me. Mind you, the few that went to pet homes might not know, I didn't know I should check her teeth every week. I was just getting her used to having her teeth brushed when I noticed it. I would love to wait, she's such a tiny gentle thing. I did ask Tully's vet what she thought (on a phone consult) and she said get them out in next couple of weeks.

    Thanks Gloria, I will definitely ask about doing X-rays first. Urgh, there goes the renovation money again. Lucky I just got an insurance pay out for the hail storm in Jan - who needs awnings anyway.
     

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