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Revolving Door Syndrome

Discussion in 'General Dog Chat' started by Ron Atkinson, Sep 22, 2021.

  1. Ron Atkinson

    Ron Atkinson Premium Member

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    I just don't understand some dog owners. Teddy and I walk by 1 house that has a fenced in yard and a puppy that was so happy to see Teddy because he was bored and lonely. After about 3 weeks my wife heard he was given to a different family after he ate a mattress. Two weeks later they have a different puppy. :(
    I was always brought up that when you got a puppy it became a new family member for life and you took care of it to the best of your ability until the very end good, bad or challenging.
    My wife reminded me just because I think like that not everyone does. Just proves I married a very wise woman. :)
     
  2. Sharon7

    Sharon7 Moderator

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    This is such a shame, and I feel the way you do about it. I was a vet tech years ago - a man and his about 7 year old boy brought in a beautiful 2 year old female Doberman, who had a broken leg. It had been broken about a week, and now they wanted to put her to sleep because they didn't want to fix her. That dog leaned on me as I held her - I was ready to explode. Thank god my vet said, "How about if we keep her, fix her leg and find her a good home? She's so young." Well, that guy was delighted to foist off his problem onto someone else. I often thought about what that little boy learned from that. She got fixed and adopted into a great home.

    It wouldn't surprise me if they went out and got another dog.
    Nope, in my book, dogs are family. I would often tell friends who neglected their dogs, that they don't just go into suspended animation when you are gone! They have a life and needs of their own, which we should be trying to meet.

    I hope first puppy got a better home and second puppy doesn't have the same fate.
     
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  3. ghggp

    ghggp Moderator

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    C4AAD66A-4037-4D3B-BFF2-0780B2B3A58A.png
    it is so sad and so wrong! Pets are for life! It is even difficult for rescues dealing with less than stellar folks wanting to adopt. They have strict rules when adopting yet some folks just are not truthful. That’s why I love this site! We CARE!
     
    Darren, RikyR, Sandy in CT and 5 others like this.
  4. trini

    trini Premium Member

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    Ron, I am 100% with you on this. Having fostered for rescue for many years I saw way too many pups and dogs dumped simply because they were not perfectly behaved all the time. How incredibly sad that this little happy pup is no longer there to greet you and Teddy. I hope that poor little pup at least got a better second home and I have to wonder how long this next pup will last. :no:
    Trini
     
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  5. Ann

    Ann Moderator

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    I'm with you, Ron. This is why I have six dogs. I'm an epic fail at "rehoming" them, something frequently done with show dogs who either don't take to the show ring or don't measure up. Once a dog joins our family, it is with us for life. They are pets first, show dogs second and we love them all.

    I do understand that breeders have to place their retired dogs to make room for others, and most are very careful about finding them great homes. But I'll never understand how you give up a pet unless it's dangerous. Many people don't want to put in the time and effort it takes to train a dog or puppy unfortunately, and Covid has added to the problem with the people who decided a dog was a terrific idea while in lockdown. Now, returning to normal, it's not as easy and I fear many of those pandemic puppies will end up in shelters.

    I hope your neighbors figure out that puppies don't come ready made with manners and training, and their first one has found a home with better owners. :yes:
     
  6. trini

    trini Premium Member

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    Gloria,
    Your update/rant is just so heartbreaking...such precious souls who deserved to be loved and properly cared for when adopted out. It is so confusing to a little dog to be shuffled from home to home and learn to have no confidence that a place where they may have been happy is no longer their's. Dogs remember and each rejection hurts.
    It is hard when people are not truthful but double checking with the vet they have used will often bring up a red flag on someone who has lied on their application. At least a couple of times I found that people who seemed like a great match from just reading their application or talking with them on the phone, turned out to be less than responsible caring homes when I checked with their vet.
    Trini
     
  7. Bailey's Mom

    Bailey's Mom Forums Enthusiast

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    I guess for me the real issue is the second dog not rehoming the first one. I come from a very different perspective than most to this issue. Our first rescue was a puppy when he was surrendered to rescue and his foster Mom gave us the greatest gift by sending us a house broken puppy with the beginning of training. I can't express what a gift it was. The couple had gotten Bailey when they had their first child thinking it would be "cute" for their child to grow up with the dog, not realizing a puppy was like having a second child. It was stupid but they did get the dog to a Sheltie Rescue they didn't abandon it to the local pound. I hope if they got a second dog they were in a much more stable living environment to know when they could have the time and patience for a dog along with kid or by that point perhaps kids. I refuse to condemn these people because had they sucked it up Bailey could have suffered. He was the kind of dog who needed your complete attention and with two stressed out parents that could have created a bad situation. I'd much rather see a dog owner admit they made a mistake and get the dog to a better place than wait until the dog has developed all kinds of issues from neglect and behavioral issues from lack of training.

    Our second rescue, came to us at 2 she is now 13. Her situation was one of neglect from what I understand not what most would classify abuse in the physical sense. While we would never have had the privilege and love she has given us these 11 years I TRULY WISH her first family had the courage and strength to understand they'd made a mistake and they didn't have the time, resources, or what ever caused them to neglect her and had surrendered her much earlier. I can only imagine knowing what an amazing dog she is how much more she could have experienced if she had not developed many of the challenges she got during those 2 years prior to rescue. Her family probably didn't think that giving up was OK and kept plodding ahead while the dog was benefiting from their suck it up and deal attitude.

    The reality is that not all people are going to try and given a choice of seeing dogs stuck in those situations so people don't have to admit they've failed the dog or seeing the dog get to a family that can truly care for it I will vote every day and twice on Sunday to see the dog go to a foster situation as early as possible so minimal damage is done. The key is helping those families to realize what failed and perhaps trying to get them not to get more animals until those situations change. Sometimes you can't stop people and sometimes you can help them understand what went bad and why.

    As for behavioral dogs being returned first I do believe shelters need to fully disclose what they know about a dog's issues. We've had 3 successful Sheltie placements 2 rescues and 1 breeder placement. Prior to the last dog which was a breeder placement we did have a rescue fail. Our one and only requirement with the rescue was the dog had to be able to get along with the 2 dogs we had. We would not accept a dog that was aggressive. We were assured the Sheltie being placed with us was not a problem at all. We had some concerns when we met him but were assured it was all good. He attacked both our dogs and we found out he had been placed separately from the dog he came in with because of his aggression issues. He had problems with older dogs and female dogs both of which they knew we had in our home and we found out after the fact that he was supposed to have been an only dog. I still have no guilt about returning him to the rescue. He needed to be an only dog and that was the best placement for him. Our house was not a good choice for him or us and had we been informed of his problems we would never have thought about the adoption. Our loyalty is to the two who were here and I was not going to do anything that would cause them harm. He was not able to settle in as part of our family because he wasn't able to live with other dogs. I wasn't willing to let him hurt the other dogs so I could say I'd never had a rescue fail. If I had adopted him knowing about his aggression issues and then thinking I didn't want to manage them I would be the moron who thought I could handle something knowing I didn't have the skills to handle it. However, even if I had made the mistake it would have been foolish to punish all 3 dogs with a bad placement when he could have gone to a different home with someone who might be able to handle his issues.

    I can't tell you over the years how many aggressive rescues I've met from people who don't get them trained or don't know how to get them trained and they become issues with the local animal control officers. One solution to this problem might be fundraising for local shelters to bring in trainers for dogs with issues so they aren't constantly being returned. So many people think they are doing the right thing by picking out a tough to place dog but there are reasons why these animals are often hard to place. Some of them can be dealt with through training and perhaps that needs to be a focus for people serious about helping out with rescue. You can continue to blame bad rescuers but one solution is to do what you can before the dogs are placed. It's a huge task but aggressive dogs are a huge issue nobody really likes to discuss in the rescue world. There are people who have the patience and skills to adopt and train these animals. There are soft hearted people who want to do the right thing but really are overwhelmed and need more support if you are serious about placing these animals back into the community than sending them out with training to manage their aggression is most likely going to make it a better placement.

    I've been fortunate over the years not to have a dog that runs, but logic would dictate if you are going to place a dog that runs what are some coping strategies for the family? Telling them not to let the dog get out is a little naive. Baby gates??? I have no idea as I've never had this issue but there must be experienced people who could pull together ideas and then put them out there for shelters to provide to families who show interest in adopting a dog who will run away.

    I'd also say we want to encourage people to think of their pets as family. Our 3 dogs are family. It's important for all of us to think of what could happen if we are no longer able to care for our animals. Where will they go and who will care for them?

    If the family with the dog is struggling but they still want to be a family perhaps we need more options to help them figure out how it can work. We need ideas for families before it gets to the dog has to go because we just can't do this and sometimes the time the dog starts needing training could be a point families have the least resources to do so. Shelters are overwhelmed taking care of dogs but perhaps there is a place to help people find training and care resources that could lift some of the burden of animals being dumped on shelters or at least perhaps some of the dogs would be easier to place.

    I'd also say we have to think about what is in the best interest of the dog. Dogs get attached to families but most rehome well, especially if done when they are young and before they develop behavioral issues. If someone has a dog and it isn't family wouldn't a better choice be to get it to a home with someone who will make it family rather than make it suffer so someone has to live up to a failed promise.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2021
  8. Ron Atkinson

    Ron Atkinson Premium Member

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    My wife found out the first puppy was rehomed to a family with 3 kids and 2 dogs.Things seem to be going well.c:)
     
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  9. Bailey's Mom

    Bailey's Mom Forums Enthusiast

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    That's hopeful, especially since they already have 2 dogs so hopefully they understand all the challenges and have had success with dogs. What a wonderful opportunity for the dog to be among other dogs and with kids who have experience and love for dogs.

    I only hope the second dog doesn't suffer with the family and they either get their act together or it finds a new home.
     
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  10. Bailey's Mom

    Bailey's Mom Forums Enthusiast

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    That's an interesting perspective. I realized they want to ensure you are getting adequate vet care but it makes sense you could get verification or lack of verification of what you got on an application from talking to the vet reference.

    I am for rescuing dogs from challenging situations and I am for people who have a demonstrated history of being good dog owners of getting pets. While I am a huge proponent of not leaving dogs in bad situations I'm also a believer that there needs to be ways to find that fit that leaves open the door for good homes for pets without sending pets to repeat adopters and returners. I will say I've known dog owners that have had long successful dog relationships that would be confirmed by a vet that are often don't seem to fit the ideal profile for shelters. Yet other ideal adopters seem to be the ones who end up returning dogs. Perhaps there is something to look at there in terms of how people are considered.
     

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