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What type of harness

Discussion in 'Sheltie Training' started by Tagg, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. Tagg

    Tagg Forums Enthusiast

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    I was wondering if any of you use a harness on your sheltie and, if so, what type do you use. The trainer has suggested I use one on Tinsel for safety while he is learning to live in the world to prevent his backing out of a collar and slipping into the wind. Love to hear which ones any of you have found work with the sheltie coat.
     
  2. Calliesmom

    Calliesmom Moderator

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    I use harnesses on my 3 brown dogs.
    I have this style: http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3623608&lmdn=Brand

    The way that it clips on top means much less fur gets caught while you are snapping it shut.

    As with any collar, martingale or harness, it must fit properly or the dog will be able to get out of it.

    I brought one along for Dixie when we went to pick her up- it ended up being a little too big and she did get out of it but in an enclosed area so no bad things happened. I took her to the store and tried a couple on- my Petsmart sells two brands of this style and the small in one brand tightens up a little more and was the one that I needed for her.
     
  3. danisgoat

    danisgoat Moderator

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  4. OntarioSheltie

    OntarioSheltie Forums Celebrity

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    Since Tinsel is VERY fearful you might want to consider attaching two leashes to him, one to his harness and one to his martingale.

    Toby had a REALLY bad scare early last summer and came close to escaping. There are lots of missing dog posts about scared rescue shelties escaping and the difficulty in catching them, I'd hate to hear of this happening to Tinsel.
     
  5. Tagg

    Tagg Forums Enthusiast

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    Hi Danisgoat: Actually he backed out of the martindale that I have which has the nylon webbing and link constuction and managed to get one ear completely out. He wasn't even balking with a lot of effort but his back skull is narrow compared to his neck. I can't make it any tighter or it won't go over his head that's why she suggested a harness. I actually hate harnesses having seen some of the sores behind the elbows they have caused and I wonder how much hair will be pulled but the only other option would be a nylon correction collar which I worry will be too much for his fragile mental state. Although I would never correct with it if he balks he will self correct - not in his best interest if I want him to enjoy walking and training. It's quite the dilemma. I have heard of one that has the clip in front on the chest as well as one that clips on the side that the agility people are using. The front clip, upon looking at it, would probably come off quickly so I don't think I will try that one. Then there is one that is like a chest protector with the attachment on the back. I doubt he could get free with it and it probably wouldn't pull his hair but it does do up under the belly and I wonder how willing he would be for that - not to mention trying not to trap his hair when doing it up. The other thing is he is not at the point where I could take him into the store for a fitting without him stressing right out. I know that if he gets loose right now he will be in the wind so I have to find something that will work for him.
     
  6. Ann

    Ann Moderator

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    I do like harnesses and they were recommended to me my acupunture/chiropractic vet who pioneered acupuncture some years ago. I've also had dogs slip out of martingales and other types of collars.

    I like this harness ... it's comfortable but difficult to escape from.
    https://www.comfycontrolharness.com/?gclid=CL-Oqeyr360CFUHc4Aoden7XmQ

    This is another one I've heard good thing about but haven't tried myself. It's the front clip one and is supposed to give you much better control:
    http://reviews.petsmart.com/4830/2751027/premier-premier-easy-walk-dog-harness-reviews/reviews.htm
     
    Cara Sandler likes this.
  7. OntarioSheltie

    OntarioSheltie Forums Celebrity

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    Most petstores in our area have a really good return policy. Why not go over to Petsmart and/or Pet Value, see what they have in terms of harnessesand buy a couple. So long as you don't take the tags off you can return the rejects.

    Toby's foster mom swears by TTouch harnesses.
     
  8. danisgoat

    danisgoat Moderator

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    They are impossible to back out of if it is fitted correctly. People that have dogs slip out, is because they were not adjusted properly.

    My suggestion is to get it fitted correctly. The Lupine brand that I suggested can be adjusted.
     
  9. Tagg

    Tagg Forums Enthusiast

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    Hi Ann: I do like the look of that Comfy harness. Wonder if I can get it in Canada. I will call the number in the morning. We do have "as seen on TV" stores here and maybe they will have them. Fingers crossed.
    Danisgoat: I have been using martindales for a lot of years on Belgians and Westies, in fact since they showed up here in Canada, and never had a dog slip from one. I even showed my Belgians in the show lead version of them. Tinsel came too close for comfort and I can't make it smaller or it won't go over his head as he is deep jawed - I tried. Shocked me when he sat back and it came over one ear. His backskull is really narrow which is why his ears sit so nice and high but his neck is quite a bit bigger where it meets the head. While the effect of the narrow skull, deep jaw and wider neck is pleasing to look at, it makes it difficult to find something that will prevent him from getting loose. So, until he is less inclined to balk he will need a harness or a slip collar. Since it would be too easy to have him self correct - the harness it will be for now.
     
  10. danisgoat

    danisgoat Moderator

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    You have to adjust it after it goes over there head :wink2: There's your problem!

    Shelties necks are much thicker compared to their heads. Much much different than fitting it to a Belgian and Westie. I had the same problem, as I have Irish Setters. With Shelties, you put it on, then tighten it.

    Don't feel bad, a lot of Sheltie people make that mistake with collars. Fitting a sheltie to a collar is much different than most breeds. They fit them so that they go over their head, and then leave it at that. You absolutely cannot do that with a Sheltie. That is why trainers that are familiar with Shelties recommend a "properly fitted" martingale. You need to put the collar on, then adjust it to two finger widths. The Lupine brand martingale can adjust once it is on your dogs neck.
     

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